Tag Archives: February 2019

Roane Chamber Women’s Executive Program – Feb 2019

{Pam May – Interim President & CEO, The Roane Alliance}

In 2018 Roane Chamber doubled the number of networking events available to its members. There were more workshops and Lunch & Learns as well – nearly one every week. In 2019 the Roane Chamber is kicking off a new 4-part series that provides a new networking opportunity for women, while also learning from women who inspire us all. The Women’s Executive Program is a partnership between the Roane Chamber and the Greenwood School Education Foundation and is sponsored by ORUD. Each event is held from noon to 1:30 at Greenwood School, 726 Greenwood St. in Kingston. Lunch is included. Make plans to attend the following Wednesdays: March 6, President Danice Turpin, TN College of Applied Tech – Harriman April 3, General Manager Candace Vannasdale, Harriman Utility Board June 5, Community & Public Relations Mgr Betsy Cunningham, Y-12 Federal Credit Union October 9, Major Cheryl Sanders, Tennessee Highway Patrol For more information contact Courtney Briley at 865-376-5572 ext. 205, cbriley@roanealliance.org or visit www.RoaneChamber.com/womens-executive-program

 

Is Our Retirement Health Insurance Changing? – Feb 2019

{Ron Woody, Roane County Executive}

If you are an employee, elected official, retiree or County Commissioner, you may want to make sure you have read “Impacts of Accounting Regulations” in the January 2019 newsletter. Could our retirement health insurance be changing? That will be a decision that the County Commissioners must make prior to March 31, 2019. The State Department of Finance and Administration in a Jan 18, 2019 letter establishes the deadline along with three basic options:

  • Opt-In: The county continues to offer pre-65 retiree health insurance.
  • Opt-Out: The county no longer offers pre-65 health insurance coverage.
  • Limited Opt-Out: Continues coverage for current retirees but will no longer cover future retirees.

The decisions made will impact employee benefits along with the county’s financial liabilities as noted in the previous article. The County Benefits Committee will meet in the near future to further discuss the county’s options. An executive summary will be posted on the county website.

A Partial View to DOE Activities – Feb 2019

{Ron Woody, Roane County Executive}

In 1991, an agreement was reached between the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Department of Energy (DOE) known as the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). The purpose of the agreement was to:

  • Ensure that the environmental impacts associated with past and present activities at the [DOE] Site are thoroughly investigated and that appropriate remedial action is taken as necessary to protect the public health and welfare and the environment
  • Establish a procedural framework and schedule for developing, implementing, and monitoring appropriate response actions at the Site in accordance with Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability (CERCLA), the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution (NCP), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), appropriate guidance and policy, and in accordance with Tennessee State law;
  • Prevent, mitigate, or abate releases or threatened releases of hazardous substances from low-level radioactive waste tank systems under this Agreement prior to final remedial action at the [DOE] Site;
  • Facilitate cooperation, exchange of information, and participation of the Parties; • Minimize the duplication of investigative and analytical work and documentation and ensure the quality of data management;
  • Ensure that remedial action(s) at the [DOE] Site will be in compliance with applicable or relevant and identify appropriate requirements.
  • Expedite response actions with a minimum of delay; establish a basis for a determination that the DOE has completed the remedial investigation or feasibility study(s), remedial design(s), and remedial action(s) at the Site pursuant to CERCLA and applicable Tennessee State laws;
  • Coordinate response actions under CERCLA and this Agreement with RCRA Facility Investigations and corrective measures now being conducted under RCRA and applicable State laws;
  • Ensure that all releases of hazardous substances, pollutants or contaminants as defined by CERCLA and all releases of hazardous wastes or hazardous constituents as defined by RCRA are addressed so as to achieve comprehensive remediation of the Site.” (Federal Facility Agreement, 1991)

To reflect as “an extension” of the FFA, there was, subsequently, created a regulatory contract called the Tennessee Oversight Agreement (TOA) which was accepted and signed in 2011 (TOA, pg. 1). This agreement was between DOE and the State of Tennessee and was later broken down into three separate agreements. The details of those agreements will be addressed in another article at a later date. Presently, we will address the details surrounding the funding of the Oak Ridge Reservation Communities Alliance (ORRCA). ORRCA was established to educate the elected officials and general public on the environmental clean-up activities of DOE, as well as, emergency preparedness programs. The ORRCA website www.orrcatn.com hosts a wealth of information that assists elected officials and the citizens within the adversely affected communities in understanding the specifics of the environmental clean-up processes and progress. ORRCA also strives to educate elected officials to make more informed decisions for their community.

Reviewing Priorities and Adjusting – Feb 2019

{Ron Woody, Roane County Executive}

In our last newsletter, we discussed the planning steps of putting together the 2020 Budget. During this past month, we checked off the first step by reviewing with our departments their 2019 capital plans and budgets and worked with the budget committee on a few adjustments. This important process allows the departments to review priorities and make needed adjustments which then sets a clean tablet for the 2020 capital budget and the following 19 years. Our department heads and commission understands the importance of reviewing your goals and objectives and making the needed changes.

One of the most significant changes was the realization that the county recreation master plan probably needs updating. As we reviewed the recreation capital plan, we asked the question, “When was the last masterplan?” The plan exceeded 15 years. Thus it had been 15 years since the general public had an opportunity to make formal comments on the county recreation plan. The recreation plan includes current and potential recreation services for Roane County Residents and the county tourism industry. Since the last plan the county has taken over a TVA campground (Riley Creek), leased and built the Swan Pond Sports Complex, and the State Department of Transportation has built a multi-use crossing that connects the Roane State Community College Expo Center and Walking Trails to a potential walking trail, horse trail, or campsites at the Old Caney Creek campground area of 60 acres. Keep up with the formal recreation planning process in our future newsletters as the county recreation advisory board, and park and recreation committee begins their work.

A Town Called Adams

{Robert Bailey, Roane County Historian}

Currently, Roane County has five cities (or towns as I like to call them). However, there were others that were created but no longer exist. Among others, Cardiff, Post Oak Springs, Wheat and Emory Gap are towns that no longer exist. The town of “Adams” was also one of those that began with high expectations but has been lost to history. The following article appeared in The Chattanooga Daily Times, Mon., 26 June 1899, Vol. XXX, No. 193, p6.

“New Town In Roane County:”

Adams Will Be the Name and It Will Be a Creature of the Central. A new town is being laid out in Roane County, Tenn. at a point near the Roane college and Wheat post office. J.B. Dickinson, a prominent farmer and real estate holder of that section being the promoter. Mr. Dickenson (sic) was in Chattanooga yesterday. To a reporter for The Times, he stated that several good-sized farms had been acquired, through which the Tennessee Central will run. The townsite is above Poplar Creek and is said to be an admirable place for a little city. There is a large mill on the creek, owned and operated by J.H. Adams and we expect to call the town Adams. It is our intention to have the place surveyed at once and cut the land into town lots. There is a big spring coming out of the ridge above the site, and we expect to furnish cold spring water to the city without a pumping station.

Roane College, later Wheat High School near the K-25 plant

Originally written for the Roane County Newsletter to the Community, February 2019.

Protecting Tennesseans From Emergencies and Disasters – Feb 2018

{Laura Conner, District Director Roane and Morgan County Health Departments}

East Regional Health Office Recognized for Protecting Tennesseans From Emergencies and Disasters: The Tennessee Department of Health East Regional Health Office (TDH), tasked with improving the health and prosperity of people in East Tennessee, has been busy. One in five East Tennesseans utilizes TDH services, while we are all indirectly affected by their emergency response to health threats, licensure of health professionals, regulation of healthcare facilities, and inspection of food service establishments. In January TDH East Regional Health Office was recognized by the National Association of County and City Health Officials for its ability to plan for, respond and to recover from public health emergencies. Our East Regional Health Office demonstrated these capabilities by meeting comprehensive preparedness benchmarks required by Project Public Health Ready, a unique partnership between National Association of County and City Health Officials and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“We are proud to have been recognized by Project Public Health Ready for our high level of preparedness for emergencies,” said East Regional Health Director Janet Ridley. “This honor reflects tremendous effort, dedication, creativity, and cooperation by our entire team across our region. We will continue to improve our ability to quickly and effectively respond to any public health crises in our communities.”