Tag Archives: Ohio

Disc Golf Tournament Attracts People from 25 Cities in 3 States

{Mike Beard, Director of Parks and Recreation}

On the eleventh of November, eighty disc golfers from 25 cities in Tennessee, Georgia, and Ohio descended upon Roane County Park for the Smoky Mountain Discs (SMD) Iron Pig Disc Golf Tournament. This isn’t the first time SMD has lured golfers from near and far to Roane County for disc golf tournaments, nor will it be the last. SMD owner, Kevin Harris believes that Roane County Park is the nicest disc golf park in the Knoxville area, further noting how clean and well designed it is. This is due in large part to the Roane County Parks and Recreation staff. Thanks also go to the Roane County Disc Golf Club who showed up early to go over every inch of their home course.

The interest in the tournament was so high that SMD’s Director of Tournament Standards and Course Design, Stephen Adcock, and the Roane County Parks and Rec team had to work together to add three temporary holes to the course. Each division of golfer, from Pro Masters to Recreational competed for their share of the prize money from the entry fees. Chris Dickerson of Limestone TN, currently ranked 6th in the world, won the open. At the end of the day, everyone from first place to the last place enjoyed dining, playing and resting in Roane County.

The Killer Poet

{Robert Bailey – Roane County Historian}

The hands of justice sometimes moved slowly in the history of Roane County. One of the best examples is the killing of Thomas Galbreath in September 1884. It took 25 years before anyone was tried for the killing, in spite of the fact that the murder took place in broad daylight in front of several witnesses. Willis Maberry was Tom Galbreath’s brother-in-law and according to the records found in the Historic Roane County Courthouse archives, including a transcript of the trial in 1909, the shooting took place in Old Oakdale in Roane County (now renamed Elverton) located between Harriman and Oliver Springs.

Testimony reveals that Thomas Galbreath was in the front yard of his brother’s home with two other men when Willis shot him with a shotgun hitting him in the left side, on the arm, the back of the neck and through the leg. Lucy Galbreath was sitting inside the house peeling apples when the shot rang out. She rushed to the door, saw Maberry with a gun in his hand pointed at Tom and called him not to shoot any more since he had already killed her pig. Maberry offered to pay Lucy for the pig and did not shoot again. The pig died instantly and Tom died about 24 hours later. Some of the shots also went through a fence and Lucy’s feather beds which were drying on the fence. Witnesses testified that Maberry shot from an ambush under porch steps of the house across the street. The musket was found near the steps and had recently been fired.

Another witness, John Staples, testified that Maberry had told him some months previous to the shooting that he was going to kill Galbreath “if powder will burn for cutting (stabbing) him”. Other witnesses said the two men were close friends, but deputy Sheriff, W.C. Lyles, testified that Maberry told him he had been “cut” by Galbreath and was angry about it. Maberry took the stand on his own behalf and denied everything. He did admit that he left Roane County soon after the killing “but not until after the funeral” and traveled extensively for about 25 years, working in places in St. Louis, MO., Baltimore, MD., Cincinnati, Ohio, and Nebraska.

According to relatives, Maberry came back to Roane County in 1909, after the death of his father to claim part of the family’s property and was arrested for the Galbreath killing. He was convicted for the crime in the historic courthouse in Kingston, and sentenced to life imprisonment. The case was appealed to the Tennessee Supreme Court and upheld. He was sent to the state prison in Nashville but the story doesn’t end here.

While still being held in jail in Kingston, (pictured at the left) he began writing a poignant poem which was entitled “Roane County Prisoner.” He later finished the poem, it was set to music and became quite popular after the turn of the century under the title, “The Hills of Roane County.” Many Roane County residents remember hearing it played on the radio in the 1930s and 40s. The words to the song vary slightly, but the following is believed to be the first rendition:

In the beautiful hills, in the midst of Roane County,
There’s where I have roamed,
for many long years;
There’s where my poor heart’s been tending most ever,
There’s where my first steps of misfortune I made.
I was thirty years old when I courted and married,
Amanda Galbreath was then called my wife.
Her brother stabbed me for some unknown reason;
Just three months later, I’d taken Tom’s life.
For twenty years this old world I rambled;
I went to old England,
I was captured and tried in the village of Kingston.
Not a man in that county would speak a kind word.
When the jury came in with the verdict next morning,
A lifetime of prison were the words that I heard.
The train it pulled out; poor Mother stood weeping.
And sister, she sat all alone with a sigh.
The last words I heard were:
Willie, God bless you;
Willie, God bless you,
God bless you; goodbye.
The train left the shed at about eleven thirty;
The chains they did rattle,
The handcuffs were tight When Sonny Gibson took the throttle
The engine one-thirty was soon out of sight.
In the scorching hot sun I’ve been toiling;
Just working and worrying my poor life away.
You can measure my grave on the banks of old Cumberland
After I’ve finished the rest of my days.
No matter what happened to me in Roane County;
No matter how long my sentence may be,
I love my old home way back in Roane County,
Way back in the hills of East Tennessee.

Maberry became ill while in prison, Was released and returned to his home in the hills of Roane County. Exactly when he was released is not known, but apparently, he suffered from poor health for the rest of his life. He lived alone and his Galbreath kin folks made sure he had care and enough to eat. He died on October 30, 1925, in Knox County, TN and was buried in the County Cemetery. Sources for this article are: “The Rockwood Times”, newspaper, September 9, 1909; The State vs. Willis Maberry Loose Papers, Historic Roane County Archives; Oral history taken by Mrs. Andy Harvey from Richard Louis Galbreath, Tom Galbreath, Jr. (son of Tom Galbreath), and Frankie Galbreath Eskridge; Loose Papers, Historic Roane County Archives.

Originally written for the Roane County Newsletter to the Community, February 2018.

The Hills of Roane County

Rachel Rose Parker

{Robert Bailey – Roane County Historian}

Rachel Rose Parker, of Kingston, passed away February 16, 2017. She was Roane County Historian from 1994 until 1996, when she resigned, and I (Robert Bailey) became the county historian. Rachel and her husband, J. Clyde “Babe” Parker, the banker at Kingston Bank and Trust, were very much interested in Roane County’s history. Rachel and “Babe” were instrumental in saving the Old Roane Courthouse and preserving the Fort Southwest Point site. They also collected many photographs and historical records which are now stored at the Old Roane County Courthouse. She was born “south of the river” of which she was proud. She married “Babe” in 1939 in Loudon County, and they had one son, Frank Parker. Except for a short time during the depression when her family moved to Ohio, she lived her entire life in Roane County. She was very much interested in politics. She ran for Kingston City Mayor in 1973 and lost to Jim Henry. From there, Jim Henry went on to serve in the Tennessee House of Representatives and is currently deputy to Governor Haslam and chief of staff. Those who knew her know that she lived a full life, probably enough for 20 lives. She will be remembered for all of her adventures and stories that Babe told about her including the time that she almost got arrested in Russia and the time that she won a pig in a contest held by Brownie Ellis. She made Babe hold the pig in the back of the car while Rachel drove. Fortunately, her father was able to take the pig to his farm. She was a special lady.

Originally written for the Roane County Newsletter to the Community, March 2017.